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Following all of the latest IP developments in life sciences.

 

Andrew Williams

Andrew Williams
Andrew Williams counsels clients in patent prosecution and patent litigation with a focus in the areas of biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and molecular diagnostics.

Recent Posts

The Purple Book: The FDA Announces Welcome Enhancements

Earlier this week, the FDA announced that it has made enhancements to the Purple Book. These changes improve how information related to biological and biosimilar products is accessed through the use of a simple internet search. For readers unfamiliar with the Purple Book, it is a database of FDA-licensed biological products. However, until these recent updates, the Purple Book only existed as two lists, one from the Center for Biologic Evaluation and Research and one from the Center of Drug Evaluation and Research. Both of these lists contained current licensed biological products with reference to product exclusivity and any biosimilarity or interchangeability evaluations that have occurred. But unlike the Orange Book for FDA-approved small molecule drugs, the Purple Book does not contain a list of patents covering the drug or its use. Instead, the Purple Book includes significant dates for information relevant to the procedures outlined in the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCIA) for the approval and patent-resolution processes for biosimilar versions of approved biologic drugs. These dates and information include the date the product was licensed, and whether the FDA has evaluated it for reference product exclusivity.

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Genentech, Inc. v. Hospira, Inc. – Overlapping Temperature Ranges Can Leave a Patentee Out in the Cold

When can a prior art reference that discloses a protein purification step at room temperature render invalid a patent claim with a temperature range from about 10°C to about 18°C? Answer: When that prior art reference defines room temperature to include 18°C (which is about 64.4°F). The Federal Circuit reiterated, in Genentech, Inc. v. Hospira, Inc., that even a small overlap at the extremes of a range can invalidate claims that incorporate that range, absent a showing that the particular range is critical or that the parameter is not a result-effective variable.

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