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Following all of the latest IP developments in life sciences.

 

The Federal Circuit Adds Color to Formulation Claims in Olaplex v. L’Oréal

(as published in the May 2021 issue of the American Chemical Society's Northeast Section publication of The Nucleus)

Olaplex v. L’Oréal involves a particular problem that can arise when claiming pharmaceutical and consumer product formulations. In particular, a chemical compound, such as maleic acid as recited in the asserted claims, may be converted to different forms (e.g., salts, such as maleate or hydrogen maleate) once added to a formulation. Claim limitations that aim to specify the amounts or concentrations of such compounds in claimed formulations can be problematic when it is unclear how they are to be calculated.

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Finding the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Enablement in Amgen v. Sanofi: The Federal Circuit Provides Guidance on Enabling Antibody Claims

(Co-authored by Gabe McCool)

On February 11, 2021 the Federal Circuit upheld a United States District Court for the District of Delaware decision finding that Amgen’s function-only anti-PCSK9 monoclonal antibody claims were not enabled under 35 U.S.C. § 112. This highly anticipated decision involved a suit between the makers of the LDL-cholesterol-lowering drugs, Repatha® (Amgen) and Praluent® (Sanofi/Regeneron), filed nearly seven years ago by Amgen. Amgen had argued that patents for its cholesterol drug, RepathaⓇ, which cover a genus of antibodies that bind to a protein known as PCSK9, were sufficiently specific to allow one “skilled in the art” to “make and use” the patented invention without “undue experimentation” under the Wands factors.

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2020 Year in Review: Patent Decisions Impacting the Life Sciences

Authors: Jason Balich, K. Blake Chancellor, Sam Estabrooks, Eric Greenwald, Chelsea Loughran, Gabe McCool, Marie McKiernan, Kevin Mosier, Jonathan Roses, Claire Schuster, Charlie Steenburg, Patrick Waller, Andrew Williams

Editors: Sam Estabrooks, Gabe McCool, Patrick Waller

In the midst of many significant challenges in 2020, the year managed to see the first increase in the total annual number of patent cases in some time. In particular, the federal judiciary produced a string of biotech-related patent decisions impacting a range of issues, including enablement, written description, indefiniteness, novelty, obviousness, patent eligibility, safe harbor, and doctrine of equivalents.

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Expert Declarations in Inter Partes Review Proceedings Must Do More Than Create Noise:  PTAB Silences Challenge to Patented Method for Cleaning “Noisy” Genetic Data

Overview

On December 11, 2020, the PTAB issued a Final Written Decision in Illumina, Inc. v. Natera, Inc., IPR2019-01201, upholding the validity of Natera Inc.’s patent for determining genetic data from fragmentary DNA. Illumina, Inc. (“Illumina”) filed its petition, challenging claims 1-27 of Natera Inc.’s (“Natera” or “Patent Owner”) U.S. Patent No. 8,682,592 B2 (“’592”). The PTAB instituted inter partes review of all the challenged claims on obviousness grounds. While Illumina carried its burden at the institution stage, it failed to prove the unpatentability of the challenged claims by a preponderance of the evidence as required by 35 U.S.C. § 316(e). The PTAB determined that the challenged claims were not unpatentable, and also denied Illumina’s Motion to Exclude Evidence. Central to the PTAB’s decision were the expert declarations submitted by the parties, and the noted failure by Illumina to include all of its expert’s declarations in its petition.

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Targeting Indefinite Claims: Horizon Pharma, Inc. v. Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories, Inc.

Summary

Agreeing with the district court’s decision to invalidate two drug patents for indefiniteness, the Federal Circuit reasoned that two terms (“target” versus “produce”) used in the alternative in similar specification contexts were not implicitly interchangeable in meaning, affirmed a district court’s judgment that the claims were indefinite, and affirmed that conclusory, non-factual expert testimony was not persuasive either in construing the claims during a Markman hearing or in establishing an issue of fact to prevent summary judgment.

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Economic Considerations in Granting Injunctive Relief: Federal Circuit Partially Reverses Injunctive Relief in a Case of Willful Infringement

(Co-authored by Eric Greenwald)

Overview

On August 3, 2020, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit partially reversed a District Court’s decision for a permanent injunction against 10X Genomics. Bio-Rad Laboratories had sued 10X Genomics (“10X”) for infringing three patents directed to a microfluidic system that enables researchers to encapsulate biological materials in oil partitions, or plugs, for high-throughput biochemical reactions and genomics. During trial in the District Court for the District of Delaware, a jury found the patents-in-suit to be valid and willfully infringed and awarded Bio-Rad $24 million in damages based on 10X’s sale of five product lines. After denying 10X’s motion for judgment as a matter of law to overturn the verdict, the district court granted Bio-Rad’s motion for a permanent injunction prohibiting 10X from selling the five infringing product lines. 10X appealed these decisions.

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Lessons on Inherency Challenges After Hospira v. Fresenius Kabi USA

The Federal Circuit’s recent decision in Hospira v. Fresenius Kabi USA is the latest to show how the court handles allegations of inherency in life sciences patent litigation. Jonathan Roses dissects the case, addresses whether the court created a new burden-shifting framework for such challenges and summarizes lessons that parties on both sides on an inherency argument can take away from the decision. To read the full article, which was published in Westlaw Journal, click here.

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Strategies for Patenting Artificial Intelligence Innovations in the Life Sciences

(Co-authored by Dan Rudoy)

Today, companies are developing artificial intelligence (AI) systems to meaningfully analyze the deluge of biomedical data. A substantial investment in building and deploying machine learning (ML) technology—the most active area of AI technology being developed today—warrants carefully considering how to protect the resulting intellectual property (IP), but there are challenges to doing so. In this post, we explore strategies of protecting IP for ML technology, including what aspects to consider patenting given current and ongoing changes to US patent law, and when to consider trade secret protection.

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